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Mid-Year Review or Mid-Year Renew?

Tree Face Renew WEBMany organizations conduct mid-year employee performance reviews. Fewer conduct midyear business performance reviews. Most people look forward to neither of these. However neglecting either of these robs you and your organization of valuable information. In addition, linking these two processes can give your people and your organization the jump start it needs, not only for the rest of the year, but for the beginning of the New Year.

The idea of “looking back’ has no appeal for many. In fact, one manager at Adobe, commenting on their 1 through 4 employee review rating system, criticizes it as being a “soul crushing exercise.” That’s a pretty brutal description. The HR director dubs the company as “team oriented” and goes on to say that the rating system tended to compare one employee to another, decimating some of their top notch hires and a high turnover resulted after every review cycle. The HR director has now dumped the entire review process in favor of what some are deeming a “new” process. This process is one of more frequent, informal conversations between managers and employees. One organization calls it a “check in.”

This process is not new and has been touted by Herman Aguinis as a valuable performance monument tool for many years. Possibly what is new is gearing this process to the future and not so much to the past. After all, there is nothing we can do to change the past. Here are some ideas on how to utilize the midyear review as a midyear tool for renewal.

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Why Your Team Can't Make Decisions

Decision Pending WEBWe make hundreds of decision every day. Some may be more difficult to make than others. Deciding what to wear is a little less risky than, should I move to Bora Bora, or should I invest in soy beans or technology? When you add several other people into the decision making soup, it becomes a little more murky. There are many factors that can affect, influence, and block a team’s decision making efforts.

What Impacts a Team’s Decision Making Abilities?

  • Listening: This, of course, falls under the culture umbrella. Does the team listen to one another? Are ideas allowed to flow freely without fear of negative conflict, ridicule, or automatic dismissal? Serious conflict can be a real roadblock.
  • Team Size: The size of the team can have an affect on team decision making. The larger the team, the more difficult it will be to make a decision.

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Who’s on Your Teambuilding Team?

Teambuilding 3 WebTo begin, it’s wise to determine if your team needs a teambuilding program in the first place. Conducting a teambuilding session because, “We haven’t done one in a while.” or holding teambuilding sessions such as a romp at the local bowling alley or flying across the forest on a zip line are not all that successful. Moreover, these really don’t work if they are supposed to be seen as a reward for hard work. In addition, there are many more creative ways to help build and bond your team. So before jumping in to teambuilding willy nilly, here are some questions to ask that will help determine if a teambuilding session is needed.

Determining if Your Team Needs a Team building Session

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Your Organization’s Strength is Only as Strong as Your High Potentials’ Strengths

RevDoorWEBSo now you’ve identified your high potentials, how are you planning on keeping them and why is it important? First let’s look at what high potentials can do for the organization.
A recent Gallup study suggests that employees who are engaged are more likely to have a higher level of commitment to the organization and are more productive. Moreover, they are better able to tolerate difficult business situations. If you’re a numbers person, engaged employees are:

  • 16% more productive (Lueneburger, 2009)
  • More committed to the organization by 32% (Spreitzer, Gretchen and Porath, 2012)
  • Capable of bringing up shareholder return by 9% (Stomski and Attkinsson, 2013)

At issue is the fact that high potentials are leaving organizations at record rates that are as high as 21% (Martin, Schmidt, 2010). What organization can afford to lose so much productivity? Therefore the next big question is how do we keep high potentials engaged and on board?

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High Performers vs. High Potentials

Power People WEBAfter writing about high potentials in the nine part “Play it Again, Sam” series and having a coaching client who is taking a hard look at identifying high potentials in her organization, I wanted to explore this topic a bit further.

The Difference Between a High Performer and a High potential

A classic error many organizations make is promoting their top sales person to be the sales manager. More often than not, this ends in disaster. Just because someone can sell, doesn’t mean he or she can manage others or the sales process for that matter. The sales rep was a high performer, not a high potential. Now you promote the person who should have been promoted and he or she may feel like the second choice or the individual may have already quit for being passed over. It can be difficult to zero in on high potentials. More about that later. Michael Wilk with Profile International suggests 10 questions to ask in ferreting out a high potential.

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Play It Again Sam – Looking Through HR’s Crystal Ball – Prediction Nine of Nine – New Design & Focus for Professional Development

Prof Deve WEBIn the January/February issue of HR Magazine, Josh Bersin with Deloitte, makes nine predictions of “what’s in store for HR in 2015.” This is part nine of a series of nine articles looking at each of these predictions.

Mr. Bersin’s article on professional development concentrates on HR. His suggestions are

  • Reduce the number of HR generalists and replace them with HR business partners
  • Change the focus from “centers of expertise” to “networks of expertise”
  • Concentrate hiring and training on the new competencies of high impact HR teams

The article goes on to briefly discuss how HR needs to become more of a business partner. The way to achieve this is to become “bold, innovative, and forward-thinking.” Where have we heard THAT tune before? At any rate, Mr. Bersin was not suggesting that development be restricted to HR. In order for development to be effective, it must be embedded in an organization’s DNA. Trends or predictions, affect the entire organization, not just one department.      

The American Management Association has 10 predictions of its own about development.

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Play It Again Sam – Looking Through HR’s Crystal Ball – Prediction Eight of Nine – New Tools in HR Technology

Using technology WEBIn the January/February issue of HR Magazine, Josh Bersin with Deloitte, makes nine predictions of “what’s in store for HR in 2015.” This is part eight of a series of nine articles looking at each of these predictions.

While HR is all about keeping up with laws that change every 15 minutes, according to Josh Bersin, that’s not the case with technology. Technology, too changes seemingly every 15 minutes, and systems that are five years old are antiquated. There is no Elizabethan Tragedy here, as according to the 2013-2014 HR Systems Survey by CedarCrestone, HR is increasing spending on its outmoded technology. In fact, the report states that companies of all sizes have joined the chorus

  • 49% of companies with 10,000 or more employees
  • 46% of companies with between 2,500 and 10,00 employees
  • 41% of companies with between 200 and 2,500 employees

Spending the money is like a cantabile melody – easy and flowing, so that is not the issue. The real dilemma is where to spend the money and today’s choices are many. Technology has the power to solve problems or at least aid in many areas.

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Play It Again Sam – Looking Through HR’s Crystal Ball – Prediction Seven of Nine – Talent Analytics and Workforce Planning

Big Data WEBIn the January/February issue of HR Magazine, Josh Bersin with Deloitte, makes nine predictions of “what’s in store for HR in 2015.”   This is part seven of a series of nine articles looking at each of these predictions.

A sign on Albert Einstein’s door read: “Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted.” “Big data” is all the rage today, but does it really need to be all that big (think Neilson ratings) and is it really all that useful? Certainly data, statistics, and analytics are not new tunes that just hit the charts, particularly in the wonderful world of sports. Today we are using data, in both large and small businesses, to measure everything from behaviors such as a doctor’s bedside manner to data that could keep older drivers behind the wheel longer to data that reveals that employees who blog are happier Analytics involving more “clear cut” information such as economics, college admissions, and budgets will continue to prove useful. In addition, HR is now learning to use data for workforce planning. Moreover, data may help HR to obtain more of the business partner status it has been desiring for years.

It’s no secret that HR has not enjoyed a good reputation over the years and it has been waiting to be invited to “a seat at the table.” However, some wonder why HR has not “claimed” its seat at the table, by making itself more of a business partner. Unfortunately, many do not know where to begin to make such a transition happen. Analytics may be just the ticket. Let’s look at how analytics are changing the face of the workforce first.

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